Mistakes to Avoid When Revising Your Resume

Mistakes to Avoid When Revising Your Resume
Mistakes to Avoid When Revising Your ResumeSo you’re looking to advance your professional career as an exhibit manager. Whether you’re pursuing an advancement within your current company or are considering applying for jobs with other employers, the fact remains that you’ll want to revise and update your resume to better your chances of success. ...

Mistakes to Avoid When Revising Your Resume

So you’re looking to advance your professional career as an exhibit manager. Whether you’re pursuing an advancement within your current company or are considering applying for jobs with other employers, the fact remains that you’ll want to revise and update your resume to better your chances of success. As you revise, however, be sure to avoid these mistakes that could very well cost you that promotion or new job.

Adhering to Reverse Chronological Order

First of all, many people still subscribe to the old philosophy that your resume work experience should always be listed in reverse chronological order. While that may have been a recommendation in the past, the fact remains that it doesn’t make much sense today.

Instead, consider listing your work experience in reverse order by relevance. For example, if you’ve been out of the trade show industry for a couple of years but have been working a part-time desk job in the meantime, why list this first? When the HR manager looks at your resume, they’re most likely going to skim it; therefore, you want the most relevant experience to be on top. Keep that desk job towards the bottom.

Failing to List Notable Trade Show Presentations

Furthermore, be careful not to under-sell yourself. Whether you’ve been in the trade show industry for a few years or a few decades, there’s a good chance you’ve presented or at least had some integral part in working at a major trade show or two.

Even if you’re applying for a job within your current company, make sure to list your most notable trade show involvement on your resume (don’t assume the hiring manager will remember). After all, your resume is a chance to showcase your value, and you don’t want to leave anything out.

Spilling Onto a Second Page

Finally, do your best to keep your resume on one page. When you go to revise, this may mean having to remove things from your resume that are a little dated in order to add more recent and relevant things. By maintaining a one-page resume, you show hiring managers and HR managers respect for their time; after all, these people are likely reviewing dozens (if not hundreds) of applications and resumes. You want to present something to them that’s succinct yet memorable–not five pages long.

As explained in a Career Builder article, “you want your resume to highlight your best attributes, and hiring managers shouldn’t have to search for them on your resume.”

Revising a resume requires a lot of careful thought and consideration. By avoiding these common mistakes, however, you’ll be in great shape.

Source: mc2talks.mc-2.com